Spring 2017
Ticket #
33624

Updated 12/31/2016
 

Instructor:

Telephone:

E-mail:

Web Site:

Office hours:

Textbooks:
Since we will be learning unmanaged & managed C++ you need both of these books.
Ronald P. Kessler, Ph.D., MCSE

714.628.4754

rpkessler@hotmail.com

http://www.rkessler.com


See
schedule
 
 
Murach's C++ 2008
by Prentiss Knowlton
19 chapters, 570 pages, 244 illustrations
Published October 2009
ISBN 978-1-890774-54-7
This is an excellent book for learning modern C++ for Windows desktop apps. 

 
Jumping Into C++ by Alex Allain
Get the Kindle version for $19.99 here
Publisher: Cprogramming.com (April 2013)
ISBN-10: 0988927802
ISBN-13: 978-0988927803
This is an excellent book for learning native C++


Course Objectives

This class in programming concepts is the second semester class in C++ and is designed to help you continue learning native C++ as well as managed C++ code. It is important that you complete CS 120 before taking this course. You must feel comfortable and proficient with Visual Studio, native C++,  and the .Net model in order to understand the content of this course.

This course picks up where we left off in CS120. If you feel "rusty" and need a refresher, please go back and look at the lessons we covered in that class. The lessons in this class build upon what you have learned and will be much more technical than the first semester class was.

Evaluation

Your final grade in my class will be based on the total number of points you earn. The grade which you earn will be based upon the total amount of points you receive on the homework, in-class labs, activities, projects, and exams.  Grading will be based upon the following criteria:

90%= A
80%= B
70%= C
60%= D

The total possible points in the course will be approximately as follows:

Tests            472   (Exam 1 = 120, Exam 2 = 122, Exam 3 = 230)

Homework    280    (Approximately 10 HW Activities)

Lab Projects  150    (approximately 10 @ 15ea.)

TOTAL         902

  • When you check your grades on my home page, lab projects will show up as quizzes/labs for this class. Lab projects can NOT be made up!

  • If you turn in any project or home work that appears to have been copied from the internet, you will get a zero for that project!  Please answer all questions in your own words. If it sounds like an engineer wrote it, I will know you didn't.

Class Format & Lab

I teach this class in an interactive way. I usually introduce a topic and use the first part of class either lecturing or demonstrating stuff to you. I try use the remainder of our time letting you practice what you have learned and give you time to complete that day’s activity. It is my intention that you complete these activities in class. Unless you miss a class or run out of time, you should not have to finish activities outside of class. Your programming projects/jobs will need to be completed outside of class.

There is a one-hour lab that accompanies this course and your attendance is mandatory. During the lab you will be given projects to be completed in class for which you will receive points.

I will be available after class to help you or give you extra time to work. It is always possible to meet before class if you arrange that with me ahead of time.

Class Drops

If you decide to drop this (or any) course during the semester, please drop the class yourself.  Do not depend on your instructors to handle this for you. We do our best to keep track of your status, but it is better if you make sure your records are accurate yourself. You must drop a course before the end of the 12th week of school.

Accommodations for Disabilities

Students with verifiable disabilities who want to request academic accommodations are responsible for notifying their instructor and Disabled Students Programs and Service (DSPS) as early as possible in the semester.  To arrange for accommodations, contact DSPS at (714) 628-4860, (714) 639-9742 (TTY) or stop by the DSPS Center

MAKE-UP EXAMS

It is possible to take a make-up exam or quiz during the semester (EXCLUDING THE FINAL) if the exam is missed due to illness or other emergency. Please contact me right away if you cannot attend class when we are having an exam so I can help you with the best solution for your situation.

Student Code of Conduct/Civility/Cell Phones/Internet Use

  • Full details may be obtained from the SCC Student Handbook. At a minimum, I expect you to treat each others (and your instructor) politely and with respect. This includes turning off all cell phones (or muting them), participating in class, and arriving in a timely manner. Please remember that personal conversation during lecture time is distracting to your fellow students. Collaboration on a project is an exception, of course.
     

  • Please turn off cell phones before entering class. Do not make/receive calls or play with your phone during class time.
     

  • I may turn the internet off during lectures because it is simply too distracting to others. During lab time or before class I will be glad to turn it on for you.

Plagiarism

You are encouraged to work with other students in the class, but all work that you turn in for grading must be your own. Taking credit for another students work is plagiarism and is a violation of SCC academic policy. You will be reported for academic dishonesty. Don't let this happen to you! Remember, all work that you turn in for grading must be your original work.

Specific Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will develop skills to create solutions (algorithms) to programming problems.
  2. Given multiple solutions (algorithms) to a progrmming problem, students will evaluate which solutions are most efficient.
  3. Students will demonstrate an awareness of the implication of software privacy and the ethics of generating their own solutions to programming projects.

 

The number of projects and the points possible for exams, projects and activities are subject to change without notice. This information is intended to be an accurate overview of this course so you will know what to expect during the semester. But sometimes, we will need to modify this plan.

The Rancho Santiago Community College District is happy to provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. It is your responsibility to inform me if you have such needs.